Probate, like herding cats? No longer.

Here’s a challenge for you…

Write your Will. (morbid I know)

Now instead of writing vaguely about your estate, try and define everything you own, then divvy it out.

Tough, isn’t it? Have you remembered your stocks & shares? life assurance? All your pension pots?

Typically, most people write about jewellery in more detail than they do their financial assets. Now think, if you can’t remember where your accounts are, how do you expect someone else to? I know, for my father, I have absolutely no idea what he owns, or where. It’s just not dinner-time entertainment talk (see also ‘Very British Problems’). So, usually, we never find out until the day comes when you must shuffle through desk draws finding pieces of paper and following the trails like a never-ending kite string.

How, in any way, is this a 21st century option? Why do I, as a grief stricken individual, have to pull financial accounts as if I were pulling teeth? This is the last thing I want to be doing at that time. Anyone who has been in this position will know what I’m talking about; there are simply other, more important, things to be doing.

What’s more, I’m probably going to miss half of his accounts because:

A.     I don’t know what shares he owns,

B.     I certainly don’t know how his company pension works (I don’t really know if he had pensions from old jobs… maybe?),

C.     And, his savings and/or current accounts might as well be locked in a box-room at the Vatican’s secret archives. I’ve got the same chance of seeing them too.

You know, that’s fine. I’m happy to not know what my his financial situation is, it’s his prerogative tokeep it personal. But, I know he would blow a gasket if it didn’t go where he wanted when his time comes.

As well as being a means to deal with unclaimed assets, Monimine is an incredibly simple way of staying in-touch with your finances. Where an individual moves to a new house, if they securely log into the Monimine system, they can update their address. Monimine will then notify all the relevant institutions about the move, and your accounts should never become dormant again!

Hugely important to us, is to provide a service to those left behind. Where a spouse or family member dies, you can register this with Monimine. Monimine will then verify whether this is true using government registers (getting rid of the fraud issue) and then notify the necessary institutions. We no longer see it suitable for a widower to have to trawl up the high street notifying each institution individually (an incredibly emotionally draining process). I’m sure there will be many out there who agree, this service is hugely beneficial, and long overdue.

If you’re interested, please have a look at our site www.monimine.com, we’re 100% free to the public and will never use your data for anything other than to unite you with your assets, or keep your financial service providers up to date.

Cheers,

Andy.

When There’s A Will, There’s A Way – Particularly With Unclaimed Assets

When There’s A Will, There’s A Way – Particularly With Unclaimed Assets

writing a will good for unclaimed assets

You’ve probably heard this a hundred times, but every year, thousands of adults pass away without writing a will. It may have never affected you or your family, but when it comes to finding unclaimed assets, the lack of a will makes things complicated.

Passing away without a will is also known as intestate.

The idea of writing a will in your thirties or forties may seem morbid, but it’s essential to begin planning early. The advanced preparation ensures that your unclaimed assets go to the right place, and gives you a peace of mind.

If you haven’t written a will, you’re not alone. 78% of adults between the ages of 30-39 don’t have a will, but it’s vital that you become one of the 22% who do.

We’ve compiled five reasons why it’s imperative to put writing a will at the top of your to-do list:

  • You Decide Where Your Money Goes

Without a will, it’s impossible to inform your family about where you want your money to go. Estates from an intestate individual can often end up in the hands of distant relatives, or even the government, opposed to close family and loved ones. Retrieving money back from the state can be a difficult and fruitless task, so why take the risk?

  • You Can Sleep Easy Knowing Your Family Are Financially Secure

Acting early and writing a will guarantees that, even if you die, your family will be financially looked after with the money you left to them. This becomes particularly important if your family are economically dependent on you.

  • It Becomes Easier For Your Family To Organise

Having a will in place will make it a lot easier for your family to organise your affairs and administration. This small act will save them unnecessary distress, during what will already be an incredibly difficult time. By acting now, it will be worth it for your family in the long run.

  • Plan Finances Around Your Will

Thinking ahead allows you to plan your budget around a will. You may wish to cut some costs on your home insurance, or weekly shop, so that you can pay into a savings account for your daughter. Writing a documented will encourages you to become organised with finances, by putting money into the correct accounts. Organisation is never a bad thing.

  • Reduce Inheritance Tax For Surviving Family Members

The families of those who have died intestate end up paying significantly more inheritance tax than those that don’t. Reducing inheritance tax is especially important if you’re planning to leave money to a spouse or partner. If you pass away intestate, they might be forced to pay a hefty inheritance bill, and your assets could end up going to other, distant relatives, rather than them.

Whether you’re in your thirties or your seventies, writing a will is of the utmost importance.

Have you written a will yet? Do you have any recommendations or advice? Let us know in the comments below.

Josh Cousens – Monimine.